10 thoughts

    1. Paul, you know, the camera is somewhat glued to my hands, eye, viewfinder and shutter on autopilot, raw conversion in bibble semi automatically, upload by script… The selection process is what really needs input after pushing the trigger!

  1. Markus, sorry to hear your hay fever has kicked in. Here, spring burst out for a couple days last week, then we plunged back, not into winter, but uncomfortable raw weather in the thirties and forties (F°). The daffodils exploded into bloom, then have had to endure cold rain for days on end. I went for a shoot in a nearby forest reserve this morning. The woods were beautiful in soft light under a gentle rain, but I got chilled and couldn’t warm up all day.

    1. Carl, thanks for your words of compassion. This hits me every year, not often as heavy as now, albeit unavoidable. This fall I make a new attempt of desensibilisation, the doc is positive that it will bring improvements.

      It’s astonishing for me to learn how late spring comes in New England, deducing from the geographical fact that New York is roughly on the same parallel as Naples in Italy, where it’s much warmer than here in Bavaria throughout the whole year.

      I saw your images from your forest excursion, you really managed to capture a very gentle, spring adequate green. From the photographs I wouldn’t have concluded on such low temperatures.

  2. Markus, it’s the Gulf Stream. It heats Europe. It wends its way to the east and doesn’t warm New England. The difference in season changes compared to the British Isles is simply stunning, and the difference with continental Europe at similar latitudes remains striking. Yes, NYC is on the same meridian as Madrid. But their climates are incredibly different.

    1. Duh – really should have thought of that…

      Note to self: Try to find out why you can remember those latin irregulars but seem to have forgotten geographical basics. In spite of or because applied geography is your main subject now.

  3. While it’s amazing how you usually manage to write such informative and interesting descriptions almost daily (it’s much easier to quote something ;-)). Gute Besserung! Birch pollens’ attacking will be over in two or three days around here. It was really extreme this year. Have a nice weekend.

    1. Ah – I think it’s much simpler to write about anything interesting than to pair a quote with an image, all while applying a gentle dose of irony…
      Yes, sometimes I dream of harvesters converting overnight all those birches into wood pellets! But then, the grasses are just waiting…

    1. Thanks, Thomas. Work-wise it just looks the other way around, but if I see any chance for a new 3 years project in Sri Lanka, I will work overtime without hesitation. And if it’s only because I never have hay-fever when I am there…

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